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Short-Haired Dogs for Shed-Averse People
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Short-Haired Dogs for Shed-Averse People

Ellie, Critter Culture Staff
Updated Sep 4, 2020

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While there's much to love and appreciate about pups with luxurious coats, a long-haired dog may not be the right canine companion for those with pet dander allergies or first-time dog owners who aren't ready for special grooming requirements. Some short-haired breeds have their own special skincare and grooming needs, but they tend to shed less and are a better option for those suffering from allergies.

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1

Italian Greyhound

Italian Greyhound in a park f8grapher / Getty Images

Italian greyhounds are known for their calm and easy-going nature. These small dogs weigh up to only 14 pounds and can live comfortably in apartments or small homes, but they do need regular exercise and walks. These tiny dogs don't shed and are easy to groom. They are very intelligent and easy to train, making them wonderful companions for most people.

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2

Dalmatian

Playing with a Dalmatian mladenbalinovac / Getty Images

Dalmations are a highly intelligent, hardworking, and easy to train. These top canine qualities led to the breed playing many roles in history, including as war dogs, coach dogs, shepherds, retrievers, fire station mascots, and circus dogs. Dalmations are a large breed and need plenty of space to run around during the day. They are a good option for active families who have time to play with the dog.

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3

Whippet

Whippet playing with their owner Mordolff / Getty Images

Whippets are known for their friendly and gentle nature. They are not particularly good watchdogs as they tend to greet strangers with affection. A whippet is best suited for active owners who can keep up with the exercise needs of these high-energy pups. They are a social breed that doesn't like being left alone for long periods of time, so make sure you can give them the love and attention they need.

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4

Australian Kelpie

Walking on the beach Luke Yates / Getty Images

Australian kelpie dogs are excellent with children and are known for their playful nature and friendly demeanor, though they don't always get on with other animals. This breed has plenty of energy and needs room to run. Kelpies are best suited to active families with young children who have plenty of time to play with their dog. Their short coat requires minimal grooming, other than the occasional bath.

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5

English Foxhound

Young cute girl playing with her dog. bernardbodo / Getty Images

English foxhounds are popular as hunting dogs, but they also make excellent family pets. These dogs have boundless energy and will need plenty of outdoor space to explore throughout the day. Their short coats require occasional brushing to keep them looking smart, making them ideal for people who don't want to spend hours grooming their dog.

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6

Rottweiler

Rottweiler and little boy ciricvelibor / Getty Images

Rottweilers are very large dogs, typically weighing between 80 and 135 pounds. They are known for being excellent guard dogs and are very protective of members of their family. These dogs can be loyal and even-tempered, but they do need to have proper training as puppies, Rottweilers can be very good with children and a great option for families who are willing to train them and take care of them.

They have low energy levels and don't require big yards or lots of walks on a daily basis. Their short coats are easy to maintain and only require minimal brushing on occasion.

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7

Rhodesian Ridgeback

Rhodesian Ridgeback in the park Giselleflissak / Getty Images

These dogs were originally bred as hunting dogs and they have some ingrained traits that make them very excitable when playing. They are not a very good option for families with young children as they can easily hurt the kids while playing with them due to their nature and size. However, they are the ideal dogs for couples or singles without children who aren't interested in spending large amounts of time grooming their pet.

Rhodesian Ridgebacks are very large dogs and they do need lots of space and regular exercise. They are very obedient and caring dogs who are easy to train.

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8

Great Dane

Great Dane going for a walk Roy Morsch / Getty Images

Great Danes are the largest domestic dog breed but they are gentle giants. They do need to be trained at an early age as their size can cause them to hurt people or damage property without intention. These dogs are excellent with children and other pets due to their friendly and caring nature. They are very protective of their family and they make excellent guard dogs. Great Danes are easy to train as they are intelligent and naturally well-behaved.

Their short coats only require minimal brushing and grooming. They do require spacious yards due to their size but they have low energy levels and don't need huge amounts of exercise.

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9

Bloodhound

Bloodhound running Manoj Shah / Getty Images

Bloodhounds are often used as working dogs by the police and anti-poaching units. They are excellent at picking up scent trails and following them. However, they also make very good pets and they are particularly good with young children. This breed has a friendly and laid back nature making them wonderful companions for almost anyone. Bloodhounds are a good choice for people who work long hours as they are very independent and don't require constant attention. They have fairly low energy levels and don't need spacious yards or large amounts of exercise.

Their coats are very short and they don't require regular brushing or grooming.

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10

Mastiff

Mastiff relaxing forisana / Getty Images

The Mastiff is a gentle giant of a dog who can weigh over 200 pounds. They are excellent guard dogs who are very protective of their family. This breed is known for having a calm demeanor and they are very good with young children making them a popular option for families. Due to their large size, they have very low energy levels and they don't require lots of walks or big areas where they can play. Mastiffs have sheer coats that only require the occasional gentle brushing to keep them looking smart. They have a lifespan of between 9 to 11 years.

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